Border fraud Larry Hopkins AKA John Horton of US constitutional patriots arrested tonight VIDEO

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Larry Mitchell Hopkins aka Johnny Horton a multiple felon, the leader of an armed border militia group that detains migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, has been arrested by the FBI. The group is United Constitutional Patriots.

During that arrest, Hopkins was in possession of a taser, two Ruger Blackhawk pistols, caliber 30 carbine and a Winchester model 94 lever action rifle caliber 30.30. He was also in possession of ammunition for those weapons.

Larry Hopkins: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Here’s what you need to know about Larry Hopkins:


1. Hopkins Has a Criminal Record Dating Back to at Least 1986 & Has Been Convicted of Impersonating a Police Officer

Arrest report from Klamath County, Oregon

FBI agents arrested Hopkins on April 20 on charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm. He has a long arrest record, dating back to at least 1986, when he was arrested and convicted of the “felony of false pretenses,” or fraud, in Midland County, Michigan. Decades later, in 2006, Hopkins was arrested in Klamath County, Oregon on charges of impersonating a police officer and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

According to the arrest report filed in Klamath County, police found Hopkins at a gas station showing off a gun to a group of young people. The arrest report says that Hopkinns was also showing the group of juveniles a badge that said “special agent” and was telling them that he was a police officer. Hopkins pleaded guilty to impersonating a police officer and to one count of possessing a firearm.


2. Hopkins Says He Has a Long-Standing Relationship with President Trump & Claims His Militia Shares Information with the Government

There’s more to Hopkins’ history than just his fictitious name and elaborate claims.

Hopkins has repeatedly said that he has sources in the US government that pass along information to him. He claims that he was getting tips “from the very top” of the government.

In a radio interview posted by The Renegade Network, Horton said that he had a long-standing relationship with President Trump and that he and the president were in close touch. He said that the president listened to his radio show and that they were exchanging information about the US border — Horton said President Trump was especially interested in the northern border. Explaining where he first met the president, Horton said, “When I was doing music, I met Trump and his first wife when he had the casino in Las Vegas, and I played there numerous times. OK?” Hopkins said. “That’s how I knew him. And Trump and I have kept in touch ever since.”


3. Hopkins Calls Himself an ‘Entertainer’ & Uses the Name of Country Music Legend Johnny Horton

Both on social media and on his YouTube videos, Hopkins uses the name Johnny Horton Jr. It’s a reference to country music legend Johnny Horton, who died in a car crash in 1960. Hopkins describes himself as an “entertainer” and also performs music. Horton says he first met Donald Trump and Ivana Trump when he was performing his music in Las Vegas. Horton also claims that the president listens to his radio show and that they exchange information about the US border.

4. United Constitutional Patriots Says They Detained Over 3,500 People at the Border in March

Hopkins is the leader of a militia group called United Constitutional Patriots. On April 1, Hopkins wrote on his Facebook page about the group’s recent activities at the border. He said the militia had detained over 3,500 would-be migrants in the past month alone. He added that most of the detainees were children whom, he said, were being trafficked by adults. The April 1 Facebook post reads:

“i am off of the border untill after the 11th , people need to see the truth of whats going on on our boder please go to the united constitutional patriots new mexico boreder ops page on face book , live streamed videos of what we are up against and why we need your support, in the last month our group of patriots have stopped over 3500, mostly kids being trafficked by adults , plus alot of young men that are wanted criminals, i will be going back to the border soon we need help, GOD BLESS YOU ALL.”

Horton’s Facebook page includes photos and videos of heavily armed members of his militia standing beside American flags. Many of the men are wearing camouflage; others have bandannas tied around their faces.

5. New Mexico’s Attorney General Called Hopkins a ‘Dangerous Felon’ Who Should not Have Weapons

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After Hopkins’ arrest, the attorney general of New Mexico, Hector Balderas, issued a statement praising his arrest. The statement said, “This is a dangerous felon who should not have weapons around children and families. Today’s arrest by the FBI indicates clearly that the rule of law should be in the hands of trained law enforcement officials, not armed vigilantes.”

FBI agents arrested Hopkins in Sunland Park, New Mexico on April 20 on charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition. Hopkins has a long history of arrests for gun charges and fraud. He is the leader of a militia group, United Constitutional Patriots, which detains would-be migrants at gunpoint along the US-Mexico border.


In 2006, he was arrested in Klamath County, Oregon, on suspicion of impersonating a police officer and being a felon in possession of a firearm. Hopkins ended up pleading no contest to the impersonation charge and guilty to a gun possession charge. Both were felonies. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail and three years of probation.

The details outlined in his arrest report contain some striking similarities to the kinds of grandiose stories he’s been telling in recent months.

On Nov. 5, 2006, Klamath County Sheriff’s Deputy Jack Daniel received a call from a reserve deputy, who was at a gas station just a short drive from the California state line. The reserve deputy said there was a man in the parking lot “bragging about going on drug stings in Louisiana and stating that he worked for the government,” according to the report.

In the report, the deputy described how Hopkins, who did not return calls seeking comment for this article, was dressed when he arrived.

“I observed that Larry Hopkins was wearing a black uniform style shirt and black pants,” the deputy wrote. “Hopkins had a badge similar in appearance to a police officer badge pinned above his left breast in the area a police officer would wear a badge. Hopkins had a gold star on each of his collars which is often a sign of rank. Hopkins had several military or law enforcement style pins all over his shirt in a uniform appearance.”

The reserve deputy, who’d remained at the gas station until backup arrived, said that Hopkins claimed to be working “directly under George Bush,” who was president at the time. Hopkins “also claimed to [be] doing ‘Operations’ in Afghanistan” and to be on his way “to pick up a team of agents to process a meth lab” in Northern California, the report said.

The report also said Hopkins, who was 57 at the time, had been showing off a gun to a group of teens before deputies arrived. When deputies searched Hopkins’ pickup truck, they found a piece of paper that had personal information, including the Social Security number, of an 18-year-old woman who’d been among the group.

When the deputy asked the young woman why Hopkins had her personal information, she said she believed Hopkins was going to help her get a job as a bounty hunter.

In the truck, deputies also found a Ruger pistol, a Winchester rifle and what the report described as “a stun device” disguised as a flashlight.

Hopkins told one of the deputies at the scene that he was a convicted felon and barred from possessing firearms, according to the report.

He was arrested and booked into jail.

Hopkins’ court case over the matter didn’t last long.

He was indicted Nov. 13, 2006, in Klamath County Circuit Court on three felony counts: impersonating a peace officer and two counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

The district court in Midland County, Michigan only had one page remaining on file from the 1986 case — a felony “register of actions” that gave few details on the arrest. Hatewatch was unable to obtain records from the 1986 conviction before publication.

About a month after the indictment in Oregon, Hopkins struck a deal with prosecutors. He agreed to plead no contest to the impersonation charge and guilty to one of the two firearms charges. The second gun charged was dropped in the deal, court records show.

“On 11/5/06 I gave the impression to others that I was a peace officer and I was in possession of a firearm having been previously convicted of a felony,” Hopkins wrote in his plea documents.

He also acknowledged that the new felony convictions would mean he was prohibited from buying, selling or otherwise possessing firearms – like the one in Michigan had.

Judge Richard Rambo sentenced Hopkins the same day. On top of jail time and probation, he was also hit with $1,500 in fines and court fees.

There was a hitch, however.

Hopkins had already served jail time before sentencing and, with those days credited to his 60-day sentence, was supposed to report to the probation office on Jan. 8, 2007.

Court documents show he checked in with the office on the day of his sentencing but never returned. A parole officer wrote in a report that the office called Hopkins on Jan. 8 and gave him two more days to show up. Jan. 10, 2007 came and went with no sign of him.

“At this time,” the parole officer wrote, “Mr. Hopkins [sic] whereabouts are unknown.”

A statewide warrant was issued the next day for his arrest.

Hopkins could have faced 20 months in prison had he been caught, court records show.

No one ever caught up with Hopkins for the violation. The warrant went unanswered for more than a decade.

Last year, while clearing out old cases, prosecutors asked a judge to dismiss the probation violation. The incident was “too old to effectively prosecute,” a deputy district attorney wrote.

The request was signed by the judge the same day – June 6, 2018.

was indicted Nov. 13, 2006, in Klamath County Circuit Court on three felony counts: impersonating a peace officer and two counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

The district court in Midland County, Michigan only had one page remaining on file from the 1986 case — a felony “register of actions” that gave few details on the arrest. Hatewatch was unable to obtain records from the 1986 conviction before publication.

About a month after the indictment in Oregon, Hopkins struck a deal with prosecutors. He agreed to plead no contest to the impersonation charge and guilty to one of the two firearms charges. The second gun charged was dropped in the deal, court records show.


Author: johnnyinfidel

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